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The Saint Louis Art Museum recently installed “To Encircle Base Plate Hexagram, Right Angles Inverted”—the first major public artwork by Richard Serra—in Fine Arts Drive in front of the museum.

ST. LOUIS, Dec. 18, 2018—Fine Arts Drive in front of the Saint Louis Art Museum has been reopened. The road had been closed since October to enable the installation of an important work by American sculptor Richard Serra in the museum’s collection.

The sculpture—“To Encircle Base Plate Hexagram, Right Angles Inverted”—is embedded in the asphalt between the steps of the museum’s Main Building and the “Apotheosis of St. Louis.” The sculpture can be driven and walked over, as the artist intended.

Serra’s first major public artwork, the sculpture originally was installed in a street in the Bronx, New York from 1970 to 1972 in association with the Whitney Museum of American Art’s “Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Sculpture.” It complements “Twain” (1981) and “Joe” (1999), major outdoor works installed in publicly accessible spaces in St. Louis.

“To Encircle Base Plate Hexagram, Right Angles Inverted” was donated to the Saint Louis Art Museum by Ronald and Jan Greenberg in 1984. The work was installed near the south entrance to the museum until 2008, when it was removed in preparation for the construction of the East Building. The museum funded the improvements thanks to a gift from Emily Rauh Pulitzer.

CONTACT: Matthew Hathaway, 314.655.5493, matthew.hathaway@slam.org

 

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