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EUROPEAN ART

European Art includes painting, sculpture, and metalwork made in Europe and the British Isles between the 7th and 18th centuries. Highlights from the earlier centuries include a French sculpture of St. Christopher, a Head of St. Roch, and a 12th-century German gilded figure of Christ. Later highlights include the only major portrait by Hans Holbein in an American collection; a late Titian; a sixteenth-century marble figure of the god Pan made in Michelangelo's workshop; and a painting on copper by Artemesia Gentileschi, a major female artist of the Baroque age.

View our European Art Collection

Curator

Judith W. Mann, Curator of European Art to 1800, holds an MA and PhD from Washington University in St. Louis.  Since coming to the Museum in 1988, she has reinstalled the collections of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and 18th-century European painting and sculpture three times. From 1991 until 1997, Judy held a joint position with the University of Missouri—St. Louis, where she taught courses on Medieval and Baroque art.

Judy has organized two major international loan shows. Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi: Father and Daughter Painters in Baroque Italy, which opened at the Palazzo Venezia, Rome, in 2001, and was seen at the Metropolitan Museum in 2002 before its presentation in St. Louis that same year.  In the fall of 2012, Judy curated Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, a show that was subsequently presented at the National Gallery, London, and which received the Association of Art Museum Curators’ Outstanding Monographic Exhibition Award. She has curated a number of traveling exhibitions for the Museum, including The Mourners: Tomb Sculptures from the Court of Burgundy, in 2010; Painted Prayers: Books of Hours from the Morgan Library, in 2004/2005; and The Invisible Made Visible: Angels from the Vatican, in 1998.  She was one of the two organizers of the 1997 Italian Celebration, an eight-week festival devoted to Italian art and culture.

Judy is currently preparing another international loan exhibition devoted to the practice of painting on stone surfaces throughout Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries.

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Learning Resource

Art of Europe before 1800

St. Louis Art - European Art before 1800

European Art to 1800 includes painting, sculpture, and metalwork made in Europe and the British Isles between the 7th and 18th centuries. Highlights from the earlier centuries include a French sculpture of St. Christopher, a Head of St. Roch, and a 12th-century German gilded figure of Christ. Later highlights include the only major portrait by Hans Holbein in an American collection; a late Titian; a sixteenth-century marble figure of the god Pan made in Michelangelo's workshop; and a painting on copper by Artemesia Gentileschi, a major female artist of the Baroque age.

View our European Art to 1800 Collection

Curator

Judith W. Mann, Curator of European Art to 1800, holds an MA and PhD from Washington University in St. Louis.  Since coming to the Museum in 1988, she has reinstalled the collections of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and 18th-century European painting and sculpture three times. From 1991 until 1997, Judy held a joint position with the University of Missouri—St. Louis, where she taught courses on Medieval and Baroque art.

Judy has organized two major international loan shows. Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi: Father and Daughter Painters in Baroque Italy, which opened at the Palazzo Venezia, Rome, in 2001, and was seen at the Metropolitan Museum in 2002 before its presentation in St. Louis that same year.  In the fall of 2012, Judy curated Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master, a show that was subsequently presented at the National Gallery, London, and which received the Association of Art Museum Curators' Outstanding Monographic Exhibition Award. She has curated a number of traveling exhibitions for the Museum, including The Mourners: Tomb Sculptures from the Court of Burgundy, in 2010; Painted Prayers: Books of Hours from the Morgan Library, in 2004/2005; and The Invisible Made Visible: Angels from the Vatican, in 1998.  She was one of the two organizers of the 1997 Italian Celebration, an eight-week festival devoted to Italian art and culture.

Judy is currently preparing another international loan exhibition devoted to the practice of painting on stone surfaces throughout Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries.




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