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The Fairman Rogers Four-In-Hand (A May Morning in the Park)

Artist
Thomas Eakins, American, 1844–1916
Date
1899
Material
Oil on canvas
Made in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America
Depicts
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America
Classification
Paintings
Current Location
On View, Gallery 335
Dimensions
23 3/4 x 36 1/8 in. (60.3 x 91.8 cm)
framed: 31 3/8 x 43 3/8 in. (79.7 x 110.2 cm)
Credit Line
Museum Purchase
Rights
Public Domain
Object Number
92:1954
NOTES
This painting was completed in grisaille—in black and white—for reproduction in a horse carriage coaching manual. The horses’ legs are depicted as stopped in their movement, but oddly the carriage wheels are not. Thomas Eakins consulted newly invented stop motion photographs to accurately depict the leg positions, something greatly debated before photography. Eakins’s concern for uncompromising, scientific realism brought him little success. As one reviewer noted, “the result may be scientifically true; but it is . . . artistically false. [One wishes] Mr. Eakins had denied himself the pleasure of a fascinating little experiment, and had painted his horses in the time worn way.”
- 1916
Thomas C. Eakins, Philadelphia, PA

1916 - 1938
Susan Macdowell Eakins (1851-1938), Philadelphia, PA, by inheritance from the artist [1]

by 1939 -
Babcock Galleries, New York, NY [2]

- 1954
Clarence W. Cranmer, Philadelphia, PA [3]

1954 -
Saint Louis Art Museum, purchased from Clarence W. Cranmer [4]


Notes:
[1] Susan Macdowell Eakins, the artist's wife, was listed as the owner in a 1933 publication [Goodrich, Lloyd. "Thomas Eakins: His Life and Work." New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1933, p.189].

[2] Babcock Galleries handled some of the works by Thomas Eakins from Susan Macdowell Eakins's estate [photograph of Babcock Galleries label removed from painting, SLAM document files]. However, it is not clear if this work was acquired directly from her estate or from another source.

[3] Clarence W. Cranmer was a friend of the artist and became Mrs. Eakins's agent after her husband's death [Sewell, Darrel. "Thomas Eakins." New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001, p.372].

[4] Receipt from Clarence W. Cranmer [dated November 17, 1954, SLAM document files]. Minutes of the Administrative Board of Control of the City Art Museum, November 4, 1954.
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