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Landscape

Artist
Hine Taizan, Japanese, 1813–1869
Period
Edo period, 1615–1868
Date
1864
Material
Hanging scroll: ink on silk
Made in
Kyoto, Kyoto urban prefecture, Japan, Asia
Classification
Paintings
Current Location
On View, Gallery 225
Dimensions
image: 22 1/4 × 34 1/4 in. (56.5 × 87 cm)
scroll: 63 in. × 40 5/8 in. (160 × 103.2 cm)
width from roller end to roller end: 43 1/4 in. (109.9 cm)
wood storage box: 3 1/4 × 3 5/8 × 44 in. (8.3 × 9.2 × 111.8 cm)
Credit Line
William K. Bixby Trust for Asian Art
Rights
Public Domain
Object Number
132:1984
NOTES
This wide-format hanging scroll depicts a foreground spit of land in monochrome with trees and rocks projecting diagonally from middle right to lower left. A barely discernible far shore in pale gray washes appears from the middle left to middle right. Hine Taizan, a masterful painter with an eccentric personality, was among the most important Japanese literati artists of the 19th century. Taizan’s inscription is written in columns from right to left, as is typical in East Asian writing, across the top of the composition. It includes a poem composed by the 14th-century Chinese scholar and painter Chen Ruyan (c.1331–before 1371), who had originally inscribed this poem on a landscape painting depicting spring mountains.
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