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Mummy and Cartonnage of Amen-nestawy-nakht

Artist Culture
Egyptian
Dynasty
Dynasty 22, 945–715 BC
Period
Third Intermediate period, 1069–664 BC
Date
945–715 BC
Material
Linen, plaster, and pigment
Place from
Luxor, Qina governorate, Egypt, Africa
Classification
Ceremonial objects, sculpture, textiles, textiles & clothing, wood
Current Location
On View, Gallery 313
Dimensions
14 x 16 x 67 in. (35.6 x 40.6 x 170.2 cm)
Credit Line
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Barney A. Ebsworth for the children of St. Louis
Rights
Public Domain
Object Number
109:1989
NOTES
Amen-Nestawy-Nakht, a priest of Amun, was buried in this painted plaster cartonnage which covered his carefully wrapped body. Additional outer wooden coffins, supplied only for wealthier clientele, probably completed this package of protection. The cartonnage is decorated with painted words and images that illustrate the legion of deities who escort Amen-Nakht into the afterlife and protect him for eternity. Even the rendering of his face in golden tones with rich blue details alludes to his transformation into Osiris, lord of the underworld. In the top registers or sections, Amen-Nakht is led by the gods Thoth and Horus to Osiris; the bottom register shows him being anointed by Horus and Anubis after he has passed the tests that prove his piety and purity.
arently lent to the Museum of Saint-Cyr-Sur Mer, purportedly by a French Egyptologist [French manuscript, SLAM document files]. It is possible that Raifé was this lender.

[3] The author of the 1867 auction catalogue, François Lenormant, states that Raifé's son-in-law, M. Gosset, tried to maintain the collection after Raifé's death but eventually had to sell it ["Description des Antiquités Égyptiennes, Babyloniennes, Assyriennes, Mèdes, Perses, Phéniciennes, Grecques, Romaines, Étrusques et Américaines Composant la Collection de Feu M. A. Raifé," Paris: Imprimerie de Ad. Laine et J. Havard, 1867, viii].

[4] A Paris auction catalogue dated March 18-23, 1867 lists the mummy case as one of the objects for sale from the collection of Alphonse Raifé. The mummy case is again incorrectly ascribed to Pétéménoph [Taylor letter; Lenormant, François. "Description des Antiquités Égyptiennes, Babyloniennes, Assyriennes, Mèdes, Perses, Phéniciennes, Grecques, Romaines, Étrusques et Américaines Composant la Collection de Feu M. A. Raifé," Paris: Imprimerie de Ad. Laine et J. Havard, 1867, p. 4, lot no. 18; Dawson, Warren R. "Who Was Who in Egyptology." London: The Egypt Exploration Society, 1951, p. 131; SCIPIO 29611]. There is no indication as to the identity of the buyer.

[5] In a conversation with Saint Louis Art Museum curator Sid Goldstein, Jean-Louis Domercq, proprietor of Galerie du Sycomore, suggested that the Blots acquired the case c.1950-1960. A letter dated April 10, 1990 from Jacques Blot confirms that the case was formerly in his collection [SLAM document files].

[6] Sid Goldstein and Jean-Louis Domercq viewed the mummy case at the Blot home in Nice before the Ebsworths decided to purchase it. A signed agreement dated March 4, 1988 states that Mr. and Mrs. Barney Ebsworth arranged to purchase the mummy case in 1988 through their foundation, Windsor, Inc., and to have it transferred from France directly to the possession of the Saint Louis Art Museum
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